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20121201
20121231
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we're really engaging diplomatically with china and other members of united nations security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions. >> making any progress? >> you have to talk to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy.
in my lifetime with respect to broad openings in china. a, diplomatic openings. the ones who want to recognize china will abide by the one china policy. the economic doors that have taken china to a relatively small economy to the second largest in the world. and 3, primacy of the party with its 80 million members and 3000 outposts in the world. now you have xi jinping rising to power. he has been given the party mantle and soon the military and the presidency. before him will be new questions much different from the ones that deng xiaoping was responsible for acting upon. before xi jinping will be questions like, is china more repressive at home today than in earlier years. is china more nationalistic in its economic practices, but jiggly those among the enterprises? has china become more assertive internationally? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule
it was received. my relation to china -- i went with a professor who went to china. the press said -- what are you doing? >> i said i am writing a book. "china, yesterday, today, and tomorrow." but i did go over there. [laughter] there are about 600 of them and they speak english. it is like talking to a group in texas. there is no problem in understanding how the system works. exactly what they said. how do we get from here to there? to which my response is, i do not know. that is a problem for you to solve, i cannot do it. what is it that they seem to be interested in? it is so obvious. do you think this rule of law has been given on day one and suddenly it was followed? of course not. do not think democracy will solve them. it is both your friend and your enemies. hamilton and madison right the document. it is a very good document. ask any of us on the courts, we would be in agreement on the basic things. the basic framework is it creates institutions of democracy. people can decide for themselves what kinds of community they want it is a special kind of democracy. it is a democracy that protec
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little b
in china. they have a voracious appetite for natural resources and we're looking at new ways to get these in our own backyard, and maybe i will ask you this question, admiral. admiral, maybe i will ask you this question. how important is the china factor in america energy program's going forward? >> i will talk to doubt, but i would like to mention a few puffs things about this report that may not have come out in your opening remarks. we definitely advocating opening of drilling in the united states where we cannot, but there is a -- wherever we can, but there is a very strong part of this report that says it has to be done safely and we know how to do it safely. that is one contribution of those of us who have served in the armed forces, we do a lot of dangerous stuff in the armed forces, fuel, nuclear power, explosives. the way we do that safely is a high standards, rigid enforcement, and very professional inspectors to do it. we strongly recommend applying this model to regulatory body so that we can do this safely, so that we can do oil retractions safely. that we can do safel
worked until 66, but i was forced into retirement after my company said most of the job to china. all you have to do is look around and see owns all the gas stations and 7-eleven's. those people are the rich ones that come from their countries and turnaround and bring their servants with them. that is who is running those businesses. host: what do you think needs to happen in the next couple days before the end of the year? caller: one has to happen if the republicans have to agree on bringing the jobs back from overseas. the democrats could maybe agree on cutting back on some of these food stamps, especially for people that have come here and have never worked for the country and don't deserve it. host: on twitter -- another story this morning, this from "usa today." we are still getting your thoughts for the next five or 10 minutes in this first segment of the washington journal on john boehner's "plan b" that was released yesterday in case the negotiations break down over the fiscal cliff. william from north carolina is on our independent line. caller: i was calling to tell you that th
china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the reserve currency of the world, and certain other factors that i will touch upon later, what you can do is you can expand your deficit as long as you create the circum
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
and a half percent per year, suddenly it started going up 3% a year as china and india really kicked in. other things being equal, if you change the rate of emission of co2 to the atmosphere, the so-called airborne fraction, the fraction of the co2 that appears in the atmosphere should increase, simply because that quick injection of co2 causes the ocean surface layers to be relatively saturated so it can't get in to the ocean as fast as it used to. but what's actually happened in the last 12 years is the airborne fraction has plummeted. it's now only about 40%. the other 60% is disappearing. and it's not mostly going in to the ocean. the good fraction of it is being taken up, somehow, by the terrestrial biosphere. of i think that's because the -- we were doubling -- i think we're doubling down on the faustian bargain because we're fertilizing the terrestrial biosphere, both with the co2 in the atmosphere and the combination of that with more nitrogen which will spread in part of -- the nitrogen is being spread around by these aerosols which china and india are putting out and its actua
at the council on foreign relations was spend time working on things like china and mexico and traditional foreign- policy issues, we have moved our agenda and are focused on things domestic. we want to do a report on education. we do not want to repeat what everyone else has done. we want to look at education to the filter of national security and ask the question, what is the relationship between the challenges of k-12 education and the national security of the united states? it did not turn out to be a terribly hard selll. first she cursed me because she knew i had at that point. she was there. she and joel co-chaired this task force report, our version of the commission. the idea was to take people with disparate backgrounds, educators, people do not often come together in the same space, and essentially raise the question about what is the relationship between the educational challenges we face in the national security challenges we face? to recsast this issue. the fact that you are here reflects the fact that you are here at the risk of being redundant and redundant. what we wanted t
months ago buntline and india's investment. -- china and india's investment. the rep level in which they are investing. from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 15 -- 1500 new universities by 2020. meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate educa
also have an economic competitor and a partner in china. they have a voracious appetite for natural resources and we're looking at new ways to get these in our own backyard, and maybe i will ask you this question, admiral. how important is the china factor in america energy program's going forward? >> i will talk to doubt, but i would like to mention a few puffs things about this report that may not have come out in your opening remarks. we definitely advocating opening of drilling in the united states where we cannot, but there is a very strong part of this report that says it has to be done safely and we know how to do it safely. that is one contribution of those of us who have served in the armed forces, we do a lot of dangerous stuff in the armed forces, fuel, nuclear power, explosives. the way we do that safely is a high standards, rigid enforcement, and very professional inspectors to do it. we strongly recommend applying this model to regulatory body so that we can do this safely, so that we can do oil retractions safely. that we can do safely. the general and i live in penns
investors in china than they do in silicon valley 10 years later. why did they do that? they believed the opportunities there are significant. they think there are more opportunities there than there are here. >> i would say that there have been other countries that have expanded their opportunities. there was not much chance to go back home 25, 30 years ago. we have and flattening the globe. it happens. there is a free flow of capital and ideas. i still would not try our position for anywhere else in the world. we still have a stronger university base. we still have with our challenges more access to capital than anywhere else in the world. we have an entrepreneurial system, even though some complain about the level of regulation, it is still robust. not every idea we originally thought of in america. we used to have such an enormous advantage in every field that we had the ability to look inward and think our ideas were always the best and not worry about competition. now we have to worry about the competition. i think we will step up to it. i think part of this is around this immig
that that causes, particularly in an era where rising demand for petroleum in china and india and elsewhere is creating potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize that transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum where the prices are set on the world market. canada and norway have been net petroleum exporters, but they pay in those countries the same market price for a gallon of gasoline as we do. so you must diversify, and that includes electrification of short-haul transportation, light-duty trucks and vehicles, and the adoption of natural gas either in its lick if i quide or compressed forms for heavy-duty vehicles and over the road vehicles. but taken as a whole if the recommendations of the eslc are adopted, the united states has the potential to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum and thereby reduce our national security risk to improve our balance of payments and about half of our balance of payments deficit remains petroleum, and to increase our g.d.p. by the maximization of these activities in the united states rather than exporting our d
to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threa
have as in this for a while. i think there is always china, europe, and the congress that can miss this up. i think it is hard to stop this recovery. we have done everything we can to do it. we can do it again if we try hard. i think we will not succeed this time. >> we have not talked about the creation yet, which polling showed is a major concern for americans. for the long-term unemployed who have been left behind a little bit and then to the economic recovery, do you feel like the president and congress is doing enough to address the problem? what politically and realistically could be done in the next four years? >> i think the president is committed to this. i think he would like to see an extension of unemployment insurance. he would like to see it if possible an extension of the payroll tax cut. we just released a $4 trillion deficit revenue plan that calls for four and a billion dollars in short-term stimulus. we think there is a need for a infrastructure and roads and bridges. we think it has to happen sometime in the next 20 years. we have a situation with incredibly low
vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. to keep the factories going. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker and kissinger initially, and then volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the rese
and trade secret theft on behalf of companies located in china is an emerging trend. 34 companies were victimized by a set of attacks originating in china in 2010. in the attacks, computer versuses were spread to corporate employees. foreign hackers constantly target u.s. companies in such ways in order to get every piece of competitive intelligence information they can. we simply cannot allow this to continue to happen. in response to this growing threat in our 2011 annual report, the u.s. intellectual property coordinator called upon congress to increase the penalties for economic espionage and this bill is consistent with that recommendation. i would like to commend the members of both sides of the aisle for their work on this bill, particularly the gentleman from texas, the chair of the committee, mr. smith, the ranking member, the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, the incoming chair of the judiciary committee, my colleague from virginia, mr. goodlatte and the gentleman from north carolina, mr. watt, who worked diligently on this bill and i recognize the leadership of senator l
constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have
deficit to china being $29.8 billion per month. that is just one country. you start to add up all the trade deficit that we have with all of these different trading partners over the years, i am sure that it is close to about $1 trillion per year. >> thank you for the comments. let's go to sarasota next. caller: good afternoon. the way that i look at it, as a 74-year-old professional pharmacist with a minor in economics, the reason i am independent is because republicans and democrats cannot seem to get it together. the biggest problem that we have now is the reason why we cannot do what we are supposed to do for the entire country. one middleman adnan grover norquist. someone who was never even elected. here is a man that has caused all the problems. all of the republicans have signed this pledge, which to me is unconstitutional. without him, we would not be talking today. >> salem, oregon, republican line. you are on the air. caller: good morning. as a college student, and i have listened to every single caller, this is an embarrassing day for our country. i am a first-time job
. i do think there is a level of naivete for americans that often compare what is going on in china to what is going on in the united states. having spent some time in the construction industry, there is a certain nimbleness to communism. there is the freedom of just taking over land because the country owns it all and they can say to citizens "we like this land and you leave." there is a speed and cost savings that does not allow us to compare what is going on in china today. economies are much different. our systems of government are much different. it would probably be helpful for the overall conversation to set aside those comparisons. i would like to focus on what is going on in california. can you give us an idea of what the real time line is that you expect it to be? how much more money will this cost the taxpayers to subsidize california's high speed rail? >> the investments that are being made in high-speed rail across america amount to a little over $10 billion so far. states are putting in their own money. california is certainly doing that. their assembly voted tto sell
an excessive it example, take your apples and iphones. they have 700,000 jobs of in china. the daily wage average, the people making these funds and china, 700 of and people make $2 or $3 an hour. people ask why does apple not move the jobs here? you cannot find anybody here. and a buddy who's and, would >> up at two or $3. they can make them over there, fit them over here. they are not involved in slavery. i am giving you the sense of so think of lumber are browned the world and being a book whose dome maxima and profitability while minimizing the price of a u.s. selling. apple has a huge margin. we have the understanding of slavery. how do we attack it based on this economic profile? understanding the shift, it. as to certain kinds of tactics and policies that might prove more effective. making it less profitable, awarding to be evolves in the process of child labor etc.. understanding claim supply chains. they are coming from over there. the baby tainted that certain points. leveraged demand as consumers as a wearing demand involved in global supply chains so we can make choices to pro
by "the detroit news." he's told chrysler to italians were going to make jeeps in china. romney will fight for every american jobs. >> ibm @ rahm and i approve this message. host: that ad was quickly refuted by the obama campaign. this ad became a real distraction to the campaign in the following weeks. they will say if you looked at where the results were in ohio, where they lost was not in the automobile district but elsewhere. it created a stink over the romney campaign in the final days that hurt him everywhere. to us, this ad captures something important. it is their uneasiness about talking about issues that are not helpful for them earlier on but they had to be talked about. this saw the automobile issue was playing on obama's turf. they were talking about it so it was an issue out there. when you don't talk about it and don't explain it, that's a problem. there was a notion run the campaign, if you are explaining, you are a loser. the problem was by not explaining or even addressing, they let themselves be defined. they realize this late in the game. there was huge pressure from el
years. it is because of the free trade with china that is killing us. we are going to go bankrupt because of that. we need to put tariffs on china and bring jobs back to the country. host: are these things you think congress can tackle until the next couple of weeks before we hit the deadline? i think we lost brian and there. a comment from this but talking about the fiscal cliff issue. -- a comment from facebook talking about the fiscal cliff issue. i want to show you a bit this morning of president obama in an interview with the bloomberg tv on tuesday talking about where he is in the debate. [video clip] >> i did not expect republicans to agree to any plan where they are betting that the entitlement reform will happen. we will have to have specific downpayments now recognizing we will have to continue to work to see if we can come up with better ideas to reduce health- care costs over the long term. that is the framework we are operating on. within that framework, i am happy to be flexible. i recognize i will not get 100%. i will not agree to a plan a in which we have some reve
not necessarily know what is going on. >> are there any lessons in your book for the people who live in china? there is not the openness. what would you say about the chinese leaders about their future? >> the chinese leaders have drawn lessons from these stories. the chinese leaders know this piece of history, and there is a similar time in their own history, and they also have studied very carefully the 1980's. one of the decisions they have made based on setting this piece of history is that they have made contemporary china last totalitarian in the sense that they do not make people march in parades and they have abandoned ideology of making people repeat what they do not believe in. the pressures they put on people are in that sense less. it is more subtle. you can talk about corruption, but maybe not criticize the party directly. there are unwritten rules of speech. i would say what the chinese will have to be careful of is the moment when the basis of their legitimacy begins to deteriorate. right now, they argue it has the right to stay in power because it is bringing fast growth. and
to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across the world. submarines and missiles. china is probably number one on the list. host: this from twitter. guest: that refers to overseas contingency operations. this is a fund that paid for the wars in iraq. it is about $88 billion in that account. there is a pentagon and washington funny math. some people say if the project out, we will save all this money. i wrote a report about saving $1 trillion. most of our troops will be out of afghanistan by 2014. nobody expects it will spend this level of money going out the long term in the future. so the $1 trillion in savings is money we would not have spent anyway. there are some built-in drawdowns in the defense department. in.se were built an about $487 billion over 10 years. they are coming back down. about 100,000 or so and they are built into the system. the pentagon is looking at things that way. host: roger in texas, republican caller. go ahead. caller: i am amazed i got thr
. if you look at the facts, 32% of our manufacturing base has been gutted and sold to china, india, any foreign country that has cheap labor. the top patriotic american companies are parking their profits and offshore accounts so they do not have to pay a fair share of their taxes. the bottom line is since the late '70s, the wealthiest 2% in this country are making 25 times their wealth that they made a black -- back then. there are only paying 40% more in taxes. this country is doomed if we do not start putting terrace of the imports coming into this country. the republican party is selling you an outright lie. thank you. host: let's show you a facebook posting. the economist and professor at the university of maryland will be with us and about 25 minutes or so. he will take your calls and give you his economic outlook for 2013. he has written a lot on the matter. from west virginia, independent. caller: is, sir. i would just like to say that i am not very optimistic above the future of the united states right now. we are in so much that it is pathetic. our budget is way over. this pre
as china with the issue of human rights. as long as the international community does not address the interests of the importance stakeholders, that is not really going to help. what is your take on that? >> i think they have very short form policy. i have been in moscow and we met with the russian minister of foreign affairs. syria and russia have a relationship. we need to keep such a relationship, but with such short policies by defending the assad regime, you of making such a relationship very difficult. i think the syrians see russia the same as they see the assad regime. when you see your brother and sister being killed every day -- i have been in syria and i have lots of examples. when the syrian people solve all of this happen for them, of course, they will change their position on russia. i think for russia to keep their ambassador, it is difficult to keep him in damascus. any government in the future, they will put their relationship with russia and iran as a priority. there are many voices within the opposition, and the syrian government should be open to negotiations a
with this, the british, the french, the germans, russia, china, they all tend to view this as a proliferation problem. the conversation between iran and the other side tends to be about that issue, very narrowly focused. to kind of move that conversation, you have to figure out a different kind of architecture. the five plus one process, as such, is designed to deal with the corporation issue and the composition is that has to do with the iranian violation of the mpt and there have been 62 -- six security council resolutions that suggests sanctions. there are two countries who suggest that the issue between -- that this is not a proliferation issue but has to do with the character of the regime and one of them is israel who does not view this as strictly an arms dispute and the second one is iran who similarly suggests that although it is an arms control issue, they are really using arms control as a way to undermine the regime. there are two actors in this particular conflagration who are not accepting the argument being that this is about nuclear infractions as oppo
to help china, and china is the biggest abortion country in the world. when you throw all this into a big mixture, you cannot blame the gun. host: thank you for the call and comment. a bitter fight had on gun control, according to the washington post. we are following some of the options on what is next. speaker boehner is confronting a political cliff over the budget track is, putting out that the speaker's leadership and legacy remained at stake. they point out that in a show of support, house leader eric cantor. at a news conference with the speaker in a call to extend the tax rates. some have urged congressman tom price of georgia to challenge john deere for the job. much more on what is next for the fiscal cliff. one week before we reach that point. the deadline is december 31, january 1. the president is in hawaii. the house and senate are also in set -- in session this week. elliot engel, weighing in on a number of topics, including rumors that former republican senator chuck a bill could be nominated as defense secretary. you heard from the president on friday as he nominated sena
. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the country. therefore i don't think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giants tax breaks then give it to those who want to invest in the country, who want to create jobs here, not overcease, and they think try to think of ways to get their money over there into here lower than say the american businessman paying 35%. guest: i mean, i understand your frustration. i think part of it is th
not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of it is the corporate tax .ode clearly needs to fix it a lot talk about fixing a and a revenue neutral way. it does not help lowering future deficits any easier. there are some things need to change. in general we need to realize that if we set our country on the bike path making the right investments in -- the right path making investme
working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation programs? >> when you hear discussions on sanctions, these are the things we tried to do to cut off s
talks about the role of la in china. -- rule of law in china. >> washington worked his way up. at the urging of one of his brothers he immigrated out west where the lead mine industry was in may paid a. he arrived in a ship, by stagecoach. he arrived on steamboat in this muddy town. he established a lot have been in slowly worked his way up. he became a very successful lawyer and then became involved politically. he ran for congress, search for eight terms. in any profession did abraham lincoln -- served for eight terms. as they arised, they were a close colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, initially appointed washburn secretary of state. at that time he became very ill. his family actually feared for his life. after about 10 days he submitted his resignation to president grant. grant accepted his resignation. over the next several months he regained his health which was always very fragile. he then offered him the position as minister of france. >> michael hill on the minister to france during the 1870 franco-prussian war. they provide political
is going on. >> are there any lessons in your book for the people who live in china? there is not the openness. what would you say about the chinese leaders about their future? >> the chinese leaders have drawn lessons from these stories. the chinese leaders know this piece of history, and there is a similar time in their own history, and they also have studied very carefully the 1980's. one of the decisions they have made based on setting this piece of history is that they have made contemporary china last totalitarian in the sense that they do not make people marc rich and march in parades and they have abandoned ideology of making people repeat what they do not believe in. the pressures they put on people are in that sense less. it is more subtle. you can talk about corruption, but maybe not criticize the party directly. there are unwritten will hear -- unwritten rules of speech. i would say what the chinese will have to be careful of is the moment when the basis of their legitimacy begins to deteriorate. right now, they argue it has the right to stay in power bec
importing iranian oil and all 20 major global importers of iranian oil -- including japan, india, china, and turkey -- to make significant cuts. iran today exports more than one million fewer barrels of crude each day than it did just last year. iran's currency is worth less than half of what it was last november. the pressure is real and it is growing. and let me add, we take pride in the coalition we have assembled, but no pleasure in the hardship that iran's choices have caused its own people to endure. we are making every effort to ensure that sanctions don't deprive iranians of food, medicines, and other humanitarian goods. i travel the world working to help people everywhere take part in the global economy, and we never lose sight of the fact that iranians deserve this no less than any other people. america's goal is to change the iranian leadership's calculus. we have worked with the p-5 plus 1 to put a credible offer on the table. if there is a viable diplomatic deal to be had, we will pursue it. and should iran finally be ready to engage in serious negotiations, we are ready. w
skilled individual that comes out of an american university here but they can hire them in china they will be able to do so and it is tied into this high school immigration discussion. >> i got to add that technology has created more advanced ought mated factories and that has resulted in fewer jobs necessary to build products. there is no question about that and that is a negative in terms of job creation. but it's also positive in that we have seen a little bit of a trend, and we saw apple this week announce they were going to make one of their products in the united states. it was related to the economics underliing this. if you need fewer people to make the stuff, then the cost difficult rerble to make it here versus there i did minute shs then the argument is we can make it. number two there is a national advisory counsel and one of the areas of focus has been in additive manufacturing which is really an interesting area. over the next decade it has the potential to have much more personal liesed approach, more custo approaches to manufacturing that could result in more thin
union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther king and jesse jackson, etc., etc. the re
. what if everyone in china had two cars and a swimming pool? that is not sustainable. the reason we cannot make any political progress is we have this cognitive dissonance. at the beginning of the session assayed save your money and consume more. at the same time. amazing. we have got to get beyond an economy that is predicated on unlimited, increasing amounts of consumption was no end in sight. the end is in sight. maybe if we have to cope with the reality for awhile longer, we can be more intelligent. >> on that note, we have to wrap up. one of the things that intrigued me with these kinds of situations is that ideas are very -- is very scarce resource and we have to think about maximizing and amplifying ideas. that is so incredible. the idea of possibility is so, i think, important to celebrate. when i say possibility, if people say you cannot do that and cannot do this and cannot think that, people are like -- there is a [inaudible] at work. we have to rebuild a new economy. above all, the fact that you're right. if we do not do it the planet will do it for us. i will leave it a
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
's a nixon-to-china thing. >> right. it's a different sensibility and -- >> confidence about that. >> right. again, i think we as democrats need to be very careful to think this is over with latinos. it's not. i think the playing surface is a beneficial one to the democrats right now and i think there's plenty of work. >> sorry. >> but the work needs to continue to solidify that. they -- this is an electorate that is too diverse. there's generational change happening in it. you need to stay engaged. you need to -- you know, those 800,000 to a million hispanics who are aging into the electorate need to be reached out to, need to be cultivated, need to be worked, you know, quite frankly, by both parties. i'm hoping the republicans won't. [laughter] as a partisan. and then there is this question and i don't know -- i don't think the research has been done yet and roberto can correct me if i'm wrong here, in terms of this kind of millennial question. >> yes. >> the latino electorate is young and getting younger, and the question is how -- are they going to behave like millennials? quite frankly
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
with patents. we are competing with these countries. we think it is all about competing with china, but we are competing with other advanced economies. we need to make sure we have some understanding that we are functioning in a global marketplace for manufacturing and marketing. there is work to be done to make sure the tax policy looks to the future and how we grow entrepreneurs. kasich investment in research is also -- basic investment in research is not to be taken lightly. it is medical research. it is research on new energy sources. entrepreneurs come out of these kinds of things where we seem basic research funded by the government that we take for granted. if you keep cutting that, even research and development tax credits -- they benefit companies such as doing it anyway. if we want to do it seriously, we have to say this is something you can count on. >> let me come back to the entitlement issue. the democratic side of the debate. 1969, the federal government keeps track of the total of spending that goes to investment in research and development, infrastructure, education traini
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